Bequests and Estate Planning

You can continue to have an impact on our future work by joining our planned giving program, the Tort Museum Network. By becoming a member of the Tort Museum Network and including us in your estate plans, either by a bequest, policy or account beneficiary, or a charitable trust, you will leave a legacy of fighting to preserve and expand our system of civil justice. No matter the amount, your legacy will sustain the American Museum of Tort Law’s groundbreaking work for years to come. Join us today in making provisions for the American Museum of Tort Law in your future planning.

Bequests

Bequests are one of the simplest and most popular methods of gift planning. It’s easy for you to support the American Museum of Tort Law through a provision in your will:

Specific Bequests: Designate in your will a specific asset or amount of money you wish to leave.

Residual Bequests: Designate in your will a percentage of the remaining value of your estate after all specific bequests have been made.

Both types of Bequests can be made using the following language:

“I give and bequeath [asset description / cash amount] to the American Museum of Tort Law, for its general charitable purposes.”

You may make a bequest to the American Museum of Tort Law by preparing a new will or simply by adding a codicil to your current will.

Account or Policy Beneficiary: Make American Museum of Tort Law a beneficiary of your retirement account or life insurance policy:

Your retirement plan account (IRA, 401k or 403b) can pass directly to the American Museum of Tort Law as your primary beneficiary, or it can be transferred to another entity that will pay an income for life to someone you choose, after which the remaining assets pass to the American Museum of Tort Law.

You can also make a gift of life insurance to American Museum of Tort Law. You may purchase an insurance policy with American Museum of Tort Law as the owner and sole beneficiary, or make the Museum the beneficiary or owner of the existing policy you no longer need.

Charitable Trusts

Charitable Remainder Trust

Under a Remainder Trust, your assets are signed over to the American Museum of Tort Law after a period of time that you select. Once the agreed-upon period of time is over, the assets become the property of the American Museum of Tort Law, as well as any interest or profits that might have been generated.

Charitable Lead Trust

A Lead Trust is the mirror image to a Remainder Trust. You retain control over the assets. Any interest that comes from the assets either come to the American Museum of Tort Law or is split between the Museum and any other beneficiaries you identify. When the trust expires, the control is given to someone of your choosing, usually your heirs or beneficiaries. To establish a trust, please see a tax or estate attorney. The American Museum of Tort Law can provide suggested attorneys in your area, if you are interested.

Please contact Executive Director Richard L. Newman at 860-379-0505

for more information or to discuss other ways to leave a legacy.

The mission of the American Museum of Tort Law – public education about our system of justice, trial by jury, and the benefits of tort law is vitally important. You have demonstrated you are with us, fighting to preserve and expand our system of justice. Now you can take the next step, and continue to support the crucial mission of public education. The Tort Museum Network is an incredible way to ensure the success of the American Museum of Tort Law for generations to come. Won’t you join us?